Difference between revisions of "Pederastic Desire in a Poem by Rhianus"

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From <i>The Boyish Muse</i> (Ancient Greek: Μοῦσα Παιδική <i>Mousa Paidike</i>; Latin: <i>Musa Puerilis</i>), a collection of homoerotic poetry assembled by Strato, in <i>The Greek Anthology</i>, Volume 4, translated by W. R. Paton, <i>Loeb Classical Library</i> (London: William Heinemann; Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1918).
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From <i>The Boyish Muse</i> (Ancient Greek: Μοῦσα Παιδική <i>Mousa Paidike</i>; Latin: <i>Musa Puerilis</i>, 2nd Century AD), a collection of [[Homoerotic (dictionary)|homoerotic]] poetry assembled by [[Straton of Sardis|Strato]], in <i>The Greek Anthology</i>, Volume 4, translated by W. R. Paton, <i>Loeb Classical Library</i> (London: William Heinemann; Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1918).
  
 
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Revision as of 01:27, 14 August 2019

Mirror cover with winged Eros. Bronze. Greek, Early Hellenistic Period, about 300 B.C. Boston, Museum of Fine Arts, 98.671a.


From The Boyish Muse (Ancient Greek: Μοῦσα Παιδική Mousa Paidike; Latin: Musa Puerilis, 2nd Century AD), a collection of homoerotic poetry assembled by Strato, in The Greek Anthology, Volume 4, translated by W. R. Paton, Loeb Classical Library (London: William Heinemann; Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1918).

93.—RHIANUS

Boys are a labyrinth from which there is no way out; for wherever thou castest thine eye it is fast entangled as if by bird-lime. Here Theodorus attracts thee to the plump ripeness of his flesh and the unadulterate bloom of his limbs, and there it is the golden face of Philocles, who is not great in stature, but heavenly grace environs him. But if thou turnest to look on Leptines thou shalt no more move thy limbs, but shalt remain, thy steps glued as if by indissoluble adamant; such a flame hath the boy in his eyes to set thee afire from thy head to thy toe and finger tips. All hail, beautiful boys! May ye come to the prime of youth and live till grey hair clothe your heads.


Kneeling Boy. Archaic Greek ceramic aryballos, a vessel for perfume or oil, in the shape of a kneeling diadumenos, a victorious athlete binding a fillet around his head, ca. 540–530 B.C. Athens, Ancient Agora Museum, P 1231.

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