Trochus/Hoop

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Love gift
Youth with hoop and covered cake as a love gift

The hoop held symbolic meanings in Ancient Greek myth and culture and was used to represent a boy or youth in general in Greek art. The Greeks referred to the hoop as the trochus or krikoi, and they were probably made of bronze, iron, or copper. They were driven with a stick called the elater.[1] The boys would roll them down the street running along side or have races.

A bronze hoop was one of the toys of the infant Dionysus,[2] and hoop driving is an attribute of Ganymede, often depicted on Greek vase paintings from the 5th century BC. It was a very popular toy among ancient Greek kids and the sport was regarded as healthful, and was recommended by Hippocrates for strengthening weak constitutions.[3] Though there are no images or written accounts, one can imagine that some rambunctious young Greek boy likely invented the Hula hoop 3000 years before Wham-O.

Images of the hoop are often presented in the context of boylove in ancient Greece.[4] A trochus/hoop was a favorite gift given by a Greek man to the boy he fancied [5] as well as gifts of animals, or meat. A spear, trident, or wooden staff is sometimes depicted (on pottery) penetrating the boy's hoop as a symbolic allusion to the sexual nature of the relationship.[6]

Part of the boylove history series 695px-World Map 1689.JPG
Ancient Greece

Puce 9x9 gr.png Alcibiades Puce 9x9 gr.png Ancient Greece Puce 9x9 gr.png Athenian pederasty Puce 9x9 gr.png Archias of Corinth Puce 9x9 gr.png Ephebophilia Puce 9x9 gr.png Erastes Puce 9x9 gr.png Eromenos Puce 9x9 gr.png The Exquisite Corpse of Ganymede by Andrew Calimach Puce 9x9 gr.png Greek love Puce 9x9 gr.png Greek terms applied to pederastia Puce 9x9 gr.png Gyges of Lydia Puce 9x9 gr.png Harmodius and Aristogeiton Puce 9x9 gr.png Herodotus Puce 9x9 gr.png Historical boylove relationships in ancient Greece Puce 9x9 gr.png Palaestra Puce 9x9 gr.png Pederasty Puce 9x9 gr.png Pederasty in ancient Greece Puce 9x9 gr.png Philolaus Puce 9x9 gr.png Philosophy of Greek pederasty Puce 9x9 gr.png Spartan pederasty Puce 9x9 gr.png Symposium Puce 9x9 gr.png Theban pederasty Puce 9x9 gr.png Trochus/Hoop

Gods and mythology

Puce 9x9 gr.png Apollo Puce 9x9 gr.png Cyparissus Puce 9x9 gr.png Dionysus Puce 9x9 gr.png Eros Puce 9x9 gr.png Ganymede Puce 9x9 gr.png Hyacinth Puce 9x9 gr.png Orpheus Puce 9x9 gr.png Zephyrus
Puce 9x9 gr.png Zeus

Ancient Rome

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Boylove in the middle ages

Puce 9x9 gr.png Boylove in the middle ages Puce 9x9 gr.png Pederastic relationships in history - Post-antiquity to present Puce 9x9 gr.png Pederasty in the Renaissance

Boylove in modern times

Puce 9x9 gr.png Boylove in modern times Puce 9x9 gr.png Historical boylove relationships in modern times Puce 9x9 gr.png Pederastic relationships in history - Post-antiquity to present Puce 9x9 gr.png Pederasty in the modern world

Art

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References material

Puce 9x9 gr.png A Problem in Greek Ethics (book) Puce 9x9 gr.png Erastes Puce 9x9 gr.png Eromenos Puce 9x9 gr.png Krater Puce 9x9 gr.png Kylix Puce 9x9 gr.png Lovers' Legends: The Gay Greek Myths (book) Puce 9x9 gr.png Paidika Puce 9x9 gr.png Reading list category ancient Greece

Portals

Portal:History E



Zeus and Ganymede

The images below are from a red-figure bell Krater depicting Ganymede and Zeus attributed to the Berlin Painter circa 500-480 BC. Kraters were used at banquets for mixing wine and water.[7] Zeus is shown pursuing the boy Ganymede, who is playings with a toy hoop, symbol of his youth, and a cock, a traditional gift given to boys by their male suitors. [8] The two images taken together convey the pederastic or sexual nature of the relationship.

References

  1. Athletics and Games of the Ancient Greeks By Edward M Plummer; p50
  2. Forerunners and Rivals of Christianity: Being Studies in Religious History from 330 B.C. to 330 A.D. by Francis Legge; 1915 p. 125
  3. "Hippocrates recommended playing with a hoop as a cure for weak people" Psychoanalytic perspectives on art: PPA, Volume 1 - Page 97 by Mary Mathews Gedo
  4. The ancient Olympics By Nigel Jonathan Spivey; p48
  5. http://www.scribd.com/doc/153553844/Sexuality-in-Greek-and-Roman-Culture
  6. http://www.homoerotimuseum.net/eur/eur07/329.html
  7. http://www.mam.gov.mo/photodetail.asp?productkey=2008041201094&lc=3
  8. http://www.louvre.fr/en/oeuvre-notices/attic-red-figure-bell-krater


External links