Sexually violent offense

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BoyWiki Dictionary: Sexually violent offense
n. phrase

¹ A sexually violent offense is a sexual offense which involves violence.


Sexual offenses

A "sexual offense" is any sexual activity which has been legislated to be an offense, whether it is actually harmless activity or not. Throughout history, at one time or another, various harmless and nonviolent sexual activities have been penalized, sometimes very harshly. Until recently in the U.S. all sexual activities which fell under the rubric of sodomy were also against the law.

Homosexual activity was also, until recently in most states, against the law.

Violent offense

One normally would expect that a "violent offense" would be an offense which included activities that would be considered normally to be "violent," that is "behaviour involving physical force intended to hurt, damage, or kill."[1]

In the case of so-called "pedophilia or the sexual activities which BoyLovers normally engage in with their "young friends" it is extremely rare[2] that the behavior of the BoyLover involves "physical force intended to hurt, damage, or kill."

The myth that BoyLovers are normally violent or sadistic by nature (as homosexuals previously were thought--wrongly--to be) is false, therefore the definition of sexual offenses that BoyLovers are normally prosecuted for as being "violent" is a grievous misuse of the English language.

This "blackening" of the good name of BoyLovers has been at the hands of sexophobes and antisexual third-wave radical feminists and Right-wing Christians, who actually are simply condemning homosexuality and are not genuinely working to help to "protect children" from any (imagined) harms.

Sexual violence

The term "violence" has been redefined when speaking of "sexual" activity:

The language used to describe sexual violence, and those who experience it, can carry with it particular meanings that are important both symbolically in the field and in legal terminology. Throughout this book, experiences of pressured and coerced sex are discussed under the umbrella term ‘sexual violence’, alongside criminally defined offences of sexual assault. I deliberately use the term sexual violence broadly so as to acknowledge the full range of experiences (see Chapter 2), and to remain consistent with the approach adopted by the sexual assault service sector. For instance, Centres Against Sexual Assault (CASAs) in Victoria refer to sexual violence as: ‘any behaviour of a sexual nature that makes someone feel uncomfortable, frightened, intimidated or threatened’.[3]

"Any "pressured and coerced sex" is now defined as being "violent". ‘[A]ny behaviour of a sexual nature that makes someone feel uncomfortable, frightened, intimidated or threatened’ is now considered to be "violence". [4]

"Being pressured" cannot be easily defined, and could include behaviors which are a normal part of courtship behaviors among humans. This is also true of "coercion".

Merely "making someone uncomfortable" is now considered to be "violence". [If the reader feels uncomfortable when reading these words, I apologize for making him or her the "victim" of my "violent behavior" towards them by writing these words.]

From Wikipedia:

"Sexual violence is any sexual act or attempt to obtain a sexual act by violence or coercion, unwanted sexual comments or advances, acts to traffic a person or acts directed against a person's sexuality, regardless of the relationship to the victim. It occurs in times of peace and armed conflict situations, is widespread and is considered to be one of the most traumatic, pervasive, and most common human rights violations.[5]

How exactly do we define, "acts directed against a person's sexuality"? This is very unclear.

"... by violence or coercion, unwanted sexual comments or advances..." (emphasis added)

"Unwanted sexual comments" are now defined as being "violence". "Unwanted sexual advances" are now considered to be "violence". Of course, it is extremely unlikely that someone could possibly know, when making a "sexual comment" or a "sexual advance," whether the comment or advance was welcomed or not before making the comment or the advance.

This means that it is not the nature of the sexual comment or the sexual advance which determines if the comment or advance is violent, but rather it is simply the reaction of the person whom the comment or advance was directed towards that makes the comment or advance--after the fact--violence.

"Sexual violence is a serious public health problem and has a profound short or long-term impact on physical and mental health, such as an increased risk of sexual and reproductive health problems, an increased risk of suicide or HIV infection.

The claim is that "unwanted sexual comments" or "unwanted sexual advances" have "a profound short or long-term impact on physical and mental health, such as an increased risk of sexual and reproductive health problems, an increased risk of suicide or HIV infection." This statement seems to be far from a rational statement.

If a BoyLover, for example, says to a boy that he fancies, "You're handsome" and this is an unwanted comment on the boy's part, then would you consider the BoyLover to have "committed sexual violence" against the boy? Probably not. But the law does consider this to be "sexual violence!

References

  1. Oxford Concise Dictionary, 11th ed.
  2. Child Molesters: A Behavioral Analysis For Law Enforcement Officers Investigating Cases of Child Sexual Exploitation, 3d ed., 1992. http://www.missingkids.com/en_US/publications/NC70.pdf
  3. Centres Against Sexual Assault (CASAs) website, http://www.casa.org.au/
  4. op. cit.
  5. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sexual_violence


See also

External links

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