User:User4/New BoyWiki Editing Help Page

From BoyWiki
Jump to: navigation, search


NOTE: Click ^ BACK TO CONTENTS to return to the Contents from anywhere in the document.


Contents


CONTENTS

Signing your name in talk pages using ~~~~

You should always sign your comments in talk pages by appending four tildes (~~~~) to your comment, which adds your user name plus the date and time.

For example, this is what signing with four tildes will produce:

YOUR_USER_NICK 13:44, 22 March 2014 (GMT)

Adding three tildes will add just your user name.</i>

YOUR_USER_NICK

Adding five tildes gives only the date and time.

13:44, 22 March 2014 (GMT)

If you don't know how, or cannot easily, type a tilde character on your keyboard, you can copy (then paste) the tildes from here, to use in talk pages:

~~~ (just your user name)
~~~~ (your user name plus date/time)
~~~~~ (just the date/time)

Do not sign in an article. Sign only on talk pages.

You may be able to use the number pad to type the tilde.

Press and hold down the left ALT key, then type 126 on the number pad, then release the ALT key. The tilde should appear where the cursor is.

MUST MOVE TO HELP ON CHARACTERS - PUT A LINK HERE


More info on ALT keys character entry is here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alt_code

More available symbols may be found here:

http://www.alt-codes.net/

ALSO: **** DOES NOT WORK ****

Character references that are based on the referenced character's UCS or Unicode code point are called numeric character references. In HTML 4 and in all versions of XHTML and XML, the code point can be expressed either as a decimal (base 10) number or as a hexadecimal (base 16) number. The syntax is as follows:

Character U+0026 (ampersand), followed by character U+0023 (number sign), followed by one of the following choices:

  • one or more decimal digits zero (U+0030) through nine (U+0039); or
  • character U+0078 ("x") followed by one or more hexadecimal digits, which are zero (U+0030) through nine (U+0039), Latin capital letter A (U+0041) through F (U+0046), and Latin small letter a (U+0061) through f (U+0066);

all followed by character U+003B (semicolon). Older versions of HTML disallowed the hexadecimal syntax.

TEST &#007e;

^ BACK TO CONTENTS

Simple italic and bold formatting of a word or phrase

You may use either wiki markup or HTML markup to make a word or phrase italic, bold or both italic and bold

^ BACK TO CONTENTS

Make a word or phrase italic using ''

To italicize text, just put 2 apostrophes - '' - on each side.

THIS IS SUPPOSED TO WORK BUT DOES NOT: '

''This will appear italicized when displayed.''

See "Some cautions using bold and italics"

^ BACK TO CONTENTS

Make a word or phrase bold using '''

3 apostrophes on each side will bold the text

'''This will appear in bold.'''

See "Some cautions using bold and italics"

^ BACK TO CONTENTS

Make a word or phrase bold and italic using '''''

5 apostrophes on each side makes text appear in bold italics

'''''This will appear in bold and italics.'''''

See "Some cautions using bold and italics"

^ BACK TO CONTENTS

Some cautions on using bold and italics

Italic and bold formatting only works correctly within a single line. If you start bold or italics on one line, then press "Enter" for a new line, you must again put the bold or italics markup for the text on the second line (the correct number of apostrophes).

Markup such as bold or italics will be terminated at a line break (You must put the bold/italic markup again on the text of a new line).

The following is incorrect markup:

'''''This will be in bold 
and italics.'''''

And will give this result:

This will be in bold and italics.

The following is incorrect markup:

'''''This will be in bold 

and italics.'''''

And will give this result:

This will be in bold

and italics.

The following is correct markup:

'''''This will be in bold '''''

'''''and italics.'''''

And will give this appearance:

This will be in bold

and italics.

^ BACK TO CONTENTS

MUST CODE THE FOLLOWING SO DISPLAYS IN HELP FILE

To produce text as small caps, there is a template. ???

DO WE HAVE A TEMPLATE???

Use small text only as needed.

It is better to not use big text, unless it's within small text.

A span tag can set text font-size as being 87% of prior size, to match an image caption.

Separating lines of text - one "Enter" vs. two "Enters"

Line breaks or newlines are used to add white-space between lines, such as separating paragraphs.

A line break that is visible in the content is inserted by pressing the "Enter" key twice.

Pressing "Enter" only once will place a line break (and put the text on a new line) in the markup, but it will not show in the display in the wiki (there will not be a line break in the actual wiki text), except when using list markup (making lists using ????.

Markup such as bold or italics will be terminated at a line break (You must put the bold/italic markup again on the text of a new line).

Template:Break adds multiple line breaks ???.

Template:Crlf2 adds a true carriage return and line feed.


adds a break with styling to clear floating elements. WTF???

The MediaWiki software suppresses single newlines and converts lines starting with a space to preformatted text in a dashed box. HTML suppresses multiple spaces. It is often desirable to retain these elements for poems, lyrics, mottoes, oaths and the like. The Poem extension adds HTML-like Template:Tag tags to maintain newlines and spaces. These tags may be used inside other tags such as Template:Tag. CSS styles may be applied to this tag, e.g.: <poem style="margin-left: 2em;">.

</poem>

^ BACK TO CONTENTS

Making text appear like "source code" or "monospace text" using <code>

use <code> and </code> to produce text with no formatting, similar to what is seen in computer coding. It is also called "monospace text".

function <code>int m2()</code> is very useful sometimes.

... will display:

function int m2() is very useful sometimes.

The "int m2()" above is in monospace font, as is also the text in the example box above.

The <pre> markup tag also produces monospace text in the display.

^ BACK TO CONTENTS

Create a section sub-heading using == and ===

One or more equal signs at the beginning of a line ( = ) are used to create headings.

Section headings may be used to automatically create a Table of Contents (TOC) for an article.

NOTE: A Table of Contents will automatically be created when four headings are added to an article. Use the __NOTOC__ tag to avoid a TOC from being automatically created. See: MUST PUT LINK HERE

A single "=" is used only for the main article heading and should not be used within an article.

The line above which says "Create a section heading using = " is an example of a section heading.

The heading above was created with this markup:

==Create a section sub-heading using == and === ==

You may create sub-headings by using multiple "=" signs as follows:

==Create a level two section heading==
===Create a level three section heading===
====Create a level four section heading====
====Create a level five section heading====

NEEDS A LINK See: Making a TOC (table of contents)

^ BACK TO CONTENTS

Centering text using <center>

You may use the .HTML markup to center text.

<center> TEXT TO CENTER </center>

... will give you the following:

TEXT TO CENTER

^ BACK TO CONTENTS

Align text to right side of the page

Text normally begins on the left side of the page. You may want to align the text so it is on the right side of the page instead.

Here is the tag which will do that:

<div style="text-align: right; direction: ltr; margin-left: 1em;">Text on the right</div>

... which gives you:

Text on the right

^ BACK TO CONTENTS

Make a list

CHECK IF THIS IS CORRECT Warning: when you use # inside headers, the first level won't be numbered. The source mentions this 'looks stupid'.

A normal/unordered lists using *

A simple list can be created by putting one or more asterisks (*) at the beginning of each item.

This is equivalent to using the "<li>" tag in HTML markup.

eg
* bullet list item
* bullet list item
* bullet list item

... will give you:

  • bullet list item
  • bullet list item
  • bullet list item

List items may be indented by using more than one asterisks as follows:

* bullet list item
** indented bullet list two
** indented bullet list three

... will give you:

  • bullet list item
    • indented bullet list two
    • indented bullet list three
* bullet list item
** indented bullet list two
*** indented bullet list three
** indented bullet list three

... will give you:

  • bullet list item
    • indented bullet list two
      • indented bullet list three
    • indented bullet list three


See "Some cautions on making lists".

^ BACK TO CONTENTS


A numbered/ordered list using #

A simple numbered list can be created by putting one or more "hash marks" (#) at the beginning of each item.

# numbered list
# numbered list
## indented list
## indented list
### depth 3 indented list
### more
## and more
# and more

... will give you:

  1. numbered list
  2. numbered list
    1. indented list
    2. indented list
      1. depth 3 indented list
      2. more
    3. and more
  3. and more


Normally, it is not possible to continue the numbering sequence after an included bulleted list. You can force numbered lists to continue the numbering sequence after an included bulleted list this way:

Example - You want this:

 1. Blah
 2. Blah blah
    * snark
    * snack
 3. Blorp

... BUT you get this:

  1. Blah
  2. Blah blah
  • snark
  • snack
  1. Blorp

You can "fake" it by using the following:

#Blah
#Blah blah<br>* snark<br>* snack
#Blorp

... and you get this:

  1. Blah
  2. Blah blah
    * snark
    * snack
  3. Blorp


Here is a more complex example of the above.

You want this:

  1. item one
  2. item two
    1. indented item
    2. indented item two
      * bulleted entry
      * bulleted entry
  3. item three
  4. item four
  5. item five

... BUT you get this:

  1. item one
  2. item two
    1. indented item
    2. indented item
  • bulleted non-numbered item
  • bulleted non-numbered item
  1. more
  2. and more
  3. and more


You can "fake" it by using <br>, as in the following:

# item one
# item one
# item two
## indented item
## indented item<br>* bulleted non-numbered item<br>* bulleted non-numbered item
# more
# and more
# and more

... and you get this:

  1. item one
  2. item two
    1. indented item
    2. indented item
      * bulleted non-numbered item
      * bulleted non-numbered item
  3. more
  4. and more
  5. and more


NOTE: You can also insert one of the following into a list the same way: a), b) or i), ii), etc.

# item one
# item two
## indented item
## indented item<br>a) item<br>b) another item<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;i) stuff<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;ii) more 
# more
# and more
# and more

... and get this:

  1. item one
  2. item two
    1. indented item
    2. indented item
      a) item
      b) another item
           i) stuff
           ii) more
  3. more
  4. and more
  5. and more

See "Some cautions on making lists".

^ BACK TO CONTENTS

To list terms and definitions using ; then :

To list terms and definitions, start a new line with a semicolon (;) followed by the term. Then, type a colon (:) followed by a definition.

Definition lists consist of group names corresponding to values. Group names (terms) are in bold. Values (definitions) are indented. Each group must include one or more definitions. For a single or first value, the : can be placed on the same line after ; – but subsequent values must be placed on separate lines.

Examples:

;Term to be defined:Definition of the term
Term to be defined
Definition of the term
;Verse:Spring has sprung,
:Fall has fell.
:Summer's here,
:and it's hotter than usual...
Verse
Spring has sprung,
Fall has fell.
Summer's here,
and it's hotter than usual...


NOT SURE WHAT USE THE ABOVE IS???

^ BACK TO CONTENTS

Some cautions on making lists

Do not leave blank lines between items in a list unless there is a reason to do so, since this causes the MediaWiki software to interpret each item as beginning a new list.

^ BACK TO CONTENTS

Indenting text

Making a "blockquote" (indenting a section of text using <blockquote>)

There are several ways to indent text. You may wish to indent a block of text using the <blockquote> tag:

<blockquote> This will be indented text. This will be indented text. This will be indented text. This will be indented text. This will be indented text. </BLOCKQUOTE>

This will give you:

This will be indented text. This will be indented text. This will be indented text. This will be indented text. This will be indented text.


^ BACK TO CONTENTS

Making a "blockquote" (indenting a section of text using the <poem> tag

You may also use the <poem> tag to indent text.

Note that you can include one or more spaces at the beginning of lines to further "format" the text.

<poem style="margin-left:2em;">Mary had a little lamb
  the doctor was surprised.
But when Old MacDonald had a farm,
  he couldn't believe his eyes!</poem>

Mary had a little lamb
  the doctor was surprised.
But when Old MacDonald had a farm,
  he couldn't believe his eyes!

You may adjust the amount of indent by changing the "margin-left:" in the above.

For example, by changing the "margin-left:2em" to "margin-left:6em" in the following:

<poem style="margin-left:6em;">Mary had a little lamb
  the doctor was surprised.
But when Old MacDonald had a farm,
  he couldn't believe his eyes!</poem>

... you get:

Mary had a little lamb
  the doctor was surprised.
But when Old MacDonald had a farm,
  he couldn't believe his eyes!

^ BACK TO CONTENTS

Indenting a single line using a colon :

Putting one or more colons at the beginning of a line indents the first line of the phrase or paragraph.

HOW TO MAKE A LINK FOR THIS??? See:

What a colon (:) does at the beginning of a line

You may also use a series of "&nbsp;" at the beginning of a line to form an indented line.

&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;This line is indented using &nbsp;, but a colon is preferable.

      This line is indented using &nbsp;, but a colon is preferable.

^ BACK TO CONTENTS

Indenting the line following after an indented line using two colons

See: What a colon (:) does at the beginning of a line

DO WE HAVE TEMPLATES FOR THE FOLLOWING??? Template:Outdent, Template:Outdent2

^ BACK TO CONTENTS

Making links

There are two kinds of links, an "internal link" which links to another part of the same webpage, or an "external link" which links to other pages on the same site, or to pages on other sites.

^ BACK TO CONTENTS

Create a link on a page to skip to another part of the same page

A link like this is called an "internal link".

To make a link that can be clicked on to skip to another part of the same page, you need to put two tags.

The following is the first tag, which is the link to be clicked on.

There are two parts to the link. The first part (with the # in front) is the part that the second tag uses as the "target". The second part, "CLICK ON THIS" is your description of the link, which will appear in blue as a link on the page.

[[#TARGET_ONE|CLICK ON THIS]]

In the above, only the "CLICK ON THIS" will be visible in the page display.

The following tag is the target in the article/page - the point that will be skipped to:

<span id="TARGET_ONE"></span>

You must include the same target terms in the first and the second tags.

Examples of both the first and second tags:

[[#Butterflies|Section_on_butterflies]]

"#Butterflies" is the target in the below example. The phrase "Section on butterflies" will appear on the screen as the link.

This is the second tag:

<span id="Butterflies"></span>

The target will only be visible in page-edit mode. On the displayed page it will be invisible.

NOTE: Be sure to test your links. There are limitations on the characters that you can include when making the "target". Be sure that it works!

IMPORTANT: In the <span id="Butterflies"></span> the "Butterflies" is capitalized. You must always use the same case (upper- or lower-case) in the "TARGET_WORD" in </nowiki></NOWIKI>.

If the target word is "boylovers" and you put "Boylovers" in the <span id="Boylovers"></span>, then the link will NOT work!

Example of what will NOT work:

[[#Butterflies|Section_on_butterflies]]
<span id="butterflies"></span>

^ BACK TO CONTENTS

Create a link to another wiki page

It is very easy to create a link to another page on the same wiki.

Just put double brackets [[ and ]] on each side of the link.

Here is an example of a link to the page which describes BoyWiki:

[[BoyWiki|Boywiki]]

Boywiki

To find all internal pages on BoyWiki which can be linked to, use this link:

^ BACK TO CONTENTS

https://en.boywiki.org/w/index.php?title=Special:Categories&limit=500

Create a link to a webpage on an external site

There are several ways to put links to pages on external sites. The easiest is to simply copy and paste the URL of the site. Here is a link to the (English) Wikipedia main page:

http://en.wikipedia.org/

http://en.wikipedia.org/

You may also choose to "name" or "describe" the link (which hides the URL). For example:

[http://en.wikipedia.org Wikipedia]

... will give you this:

Wikipedia

Note that for external links, only one set of brackets - [ and ] - are used.

You may wish to make the link more obviously a hypertext-format link by placing < and > around the description:

[http://en.wikipedia.org <Wikipedia>]

<Wikipedia>

For example:

If you'd like to read a fairly good encyclopedia (but one that discriminates against "pedophiles" and does not allow self-proclaimed "boylovers" to edit pages, see [http://en.wikipedia.org < Wikipedia >]and search for the archived "talk" pages for the pages related to pedophilia.

If you'd like to read a fairly good encyclopedia (but one that discriminates against "pedophiles" and does not allow self-proclaimed "boylovers" to edit pages, see <Wikipedia>and search for the archived "talk" pages for the pages related to pedophilia.

^ BACK TO CONTENTS

Creating a reference and link to an external source (see:Category:Citation templates)

You can create a numbered reference to a target external page this way:

[http://en.wikipedia.org/Pedophilia]

[1]

... which will link to the Wikipedia page, but which only gives a number (the reference) to click on.

The following is just to give you an idea how references work:

<pre> blah blah <ref>{{cite web|url=PUT_URL_HERE |title=PUT_NAME_OF_LINK_HERE |publisher=PUT_PUBLISHER_HERE |date=PUT_DATE_HERE |accessdate=PUT_ACCESS_DATE_HERE}}</ref></pre>

For quick reference, here are all the possible tags used in references:

{{cite book |last1= |first1= |authorlink1= |last2= |first2= |editor1-first= |editor1-last= |editor1-link= |others= |title= |url= |format= |accessdate= |edition= |series= |volume= |date= |year= |month= |origyear= |publisher= |location= |language= |isbn= |oclc= |doi= |id= |page= |pages= |chapter= |chapterurl= |quote= |ref= |bibcode= |laysummary= |laydate= |separator= |postscript= |lastauthoramp=}}

For more specific information on how to create a correct reference, see Category:Citation templates

END TEST

TEST:

Hello,[1] World.[2]

END TEST


^ BACK TO CONTENTS

Inserting a horizontal line (a "rule")

In HTML markup, <hr> will put a ruled line across the page.

But in wiki markup, the horizontal rule represents a paragraph-level thematic break. So do not use a horizontal line in article content.

^ BACK TO CONTENTS

Making a TOC (table of contents) using __TOC__

Use __TOC__ to automatically create a table of contents.

NOTE: A Table of Contents will automatically be created when four headings are added to an article.

It is not necessary to use the tag - not all articles need a table of contents. A table of contents is useful for a longer article which has many sections. A user may wish to "jump" directly to a sectopm by clicking the TOC heading.

If you would like to specify that no TOC is created use this tag:

__NOTOC__

... and no TOC will be created.

The number of levels shown in a TOC depends on the number of headings created using == , === , ==== , ===== , etc. The TOC may be limited to only a certain number of entries by using this tag:

??? MUST FIND WHAT THE TAG IS

^ BACK TO CONTENTS

Making text appear as "code" text using <code>

NEEDS A LINK See: Making text appear like "source code" or "monospace text"

^ BACK TO CONTENTS

Turning off wiki markup

Using <nowiki>)

<nowiki></nowiki>

... can be used to "turn off" then "turn on" wiki markup.

NOTE: Use lower-case letters for "nowiki". Do not use "NOWIKI".

MUST PUT MORE EXAMPLES

^ BACK TO CONTENTS

Using <pre>

<pre>

"<pre>" stands for "preformatted text".

Using the <pre> tag can "turn off" the wiki markup, and put the text in a dotted box.

Warning: The text, if longer than a normal line, will extend beyond the right margin, and will not be "wrapped" at the normal page margin. This will cause the margin of the page to be very wide.

NEEDS EXAMPLES

^ BACK TO CONTENTS

What is a "non-breaking space" and when to use it - &nbsp;

You can include a non-breaking space (sometimes called non-printing character) if you want two words to always appear together on the same line, such as "Mr. Smith" or "400 km/h", using   instead of a regular space between the two words which need to be always kept together, and never be separated on different lines.

Using the following:

Mr.&nbsp;Smith

... the two words "Mr." and "Smith" will never have the "Mr." at the end of one line, and the "Smith" on the start of the next line. They will always stay together.

Mr.&nbsp;Smith

Mr. Smith

400&nbsp;km/h

400 km/h

You may also use a series of <nbsp> at the beginning of a line to indent the line.

MUST PUT LINK

Also see: What a colon (:) does at the beginning of a line


WE HAVE NO PAD TEMPLATE??? Extra spacing within text can best be achieved using the pad template.

Mary Template:Pad had a little lamb. ???

^ BACK TO CONTENTS

What a colon (:) does at the beginning of a line (indents lines)

:This line begins with a colon. The colon indents the text.
This line begins with a colon. The colon indents the text.

More than one colon may be used.

:This line begins with a colon. The colon indents the text.
This line begins with a colon. The colon indents the text.
::This line begins with two colons.
This line begins with two colons.

Also you may use <nbsp> at the beginning of a line.

NEEDS A LINK See: What is a "non-breaking space" and when to use it -  

^ BACK TO CONTENTS

What an asterisk (*) does at the beginning of a line (creates simple unnumbered lists)

An asterisk creates a simple list, like the <li> HTML tag, as in the following:

*An asterisk creates a simple list.
*An asterisk creates a simple list.
*An asterisk creates a simple list.
  • An asterisk creates a simple list.
  • An asterisk creates a simple list.
  • An asterisk creates a simple list.

NEEDS A LINK See: Make a list

^ BACK TO CONTENTS

What a space ( ) does at the beginning of a line (creates pre-formatted text)

A space at the beginning of a line acts like the <pre> tag.

 This line has a space at the beginning of the line.

This line has a space at the beginning of the line.

^ BACK TO CONTENTS

Making the < and > characters

&lt; and &gt;

... gives

< and >

^ BACK TO CONTENTS

Making an invisible comment within the text using <!--" comment "-->

Put "<!--" at the beginning and "-->" at then end of text to create a comment that will be hidden and not displayed.

<!-- An example of hidden comments. This won't be visible except in "edit" mode. -->

^ BACK TO CONTENTS

Making a simple table

THIS IS FAR TOO COMPLICATED - NEEDS SEVERAL SIMPLER EXAMPLES

<div class="wikitext"><b>Example HTML Wiki Table</b>
<p>
<table border="1">
<tr valign="center" align="center">
<td colspan="1">
<strong>Column A</strong>
</td><td colspan="1">
<strong>Column B</strong>
</td><td colspan="1">
<strong>Column C</strong>
</td></tr><tr valign="center" align="center">
<td colspan="1">Entry for row 1, Column A</td>
<td colspan="1">Entry for row 1, Column B</td>
<td colspan="1">Entry for row 1, Column C</td>
</tr><tr valign="center" align="center">
<td colspan="1">Entry for row 2, Column A</td>
<td colspan="1">Entry for row 2, Column B</td>
<td colspan="1">Entry for row 2, Column C</td>
</tr><tr valign="center" align="center">
<td colspan="2">Spanning entry</td>
<td colspan="1"> Entry for row 3, Column C </td>
</tr><tr valign="center" align="center">
<td colspan="3">More spanning</td></tr>
</table>
Example HTML Wiki Table

Column A

Column B

Column C

Entry for row 1, Column A Entry for row 1, Column B Entry for row 1, Column C
Entry for row 2, Column A Entry for row 2, Column B Entry for row 2, Column C
Spanning entry Entry for row 3, Column C
More spanning

^ BACK TO CONTENTS

Why wiki markup is preferred to HTML markup in wikis

  • Consistency - all editors use the same style of mark-up.
  • The raw source for editing looks "cleaner".
  • It forces people who have spent years learning and practicing HTML markup to spend even more time learning a new mark-up language, which slows them down considerably.
  • An easy-to-use - and also free - on-line converter is unnecessary to use to convert HTML to wiki markup.
  • A very few HTML commands could be used as "exploits" (but this is easily protected against, and any good sysadmin will have done this already of necessity).
  • Some sysadmin are just jerks. ;- )

Other characters you may use in wikis

PUT THE BASIC ONES HERE. MOVE THE ADVANCED TO ANOTHER PAGE.

NOTE: I HAVE CREATED SOME NEW FILES WITH CHARACTERS AND THEIR CODING

MAKE NOTE ON USING CHARMAP.EXE IN WINDOWS see end of this file for some TABLE DID NOT WORK ON THOSE - DIV DID NOT WORK

FOR HELP WITH CHARMAP, SEE:

http://symbolcodes.tlt.psu.edu/accents/charmap.html

FOR MAC COMPUTERS, SEE:

http://symbolcodes.tlt.psu.edu/accents/codemac.html

AND

http://symbolcodes.tlt.psu.edu/accents/codemacext.html

Most laptops have an "embedded" numeric keypad which you may need to use to insert some characters - see your laptop instruction manual for how to activate and use the embedded numeric keypad-

^ BACK TO CONTENTS

Special characters


<tbody></tbody>
&Agrave; &Aacute; &Acirc; &Atilde; &Auml; &Aring; &AElig;

&Ccedil; &Egrave; &Eacute; &Ecirc; &Euml;

&Igrave; &Iacute; &Icirc; &Iuml; &Ntilde;

&Ograve; &Oacute; &Ocirc; &Otilde; &Ouml; &Oslash; &OElig;

&Ugrave; &Uacute; &Ucirc; &Uuml; &Yuml; &szlig;

&agrave; &aacute; &acirc; &atilde; &auml; &aring; &aelig; &ccedil;

&egrave; &eacute; &ecirc; &euml;

&igrave; &iacute; &icirc; &iuml; &ntilde;

&ograve; &oacute; &ocirc; &otilde; &ouml; &oslash; &oelig;

&ugrave; &uacute; &ucirc; &uuml; &yuml;

À Á Â Ã Ä Å Æ

Ç È É Ê Ë

Ì Í Î Ï Ñ

Ò Ó Ô Õ Ö Ø Œ

Ù Ú Û Ü Ÿ ß

à á â ã ä å æ ç

è é ê ë

ì í î ï ñ

ò ó ô õ ö ø œ

ù ú û ü ÿ

<a name="Punctuation.2C_special_characters"></a>

[<a href="/w/index.php?title=Full_list_of_wiki_markup_notation&action=edit&section=22" title="Edit section: Punctuation, special characters">edit</a>] Punctuation, special characters

<tbody></tbody>
What you type What it looks like
&iquest; &iexcl; &sect; &para;

&dagger; &Dagger; &bull; &ndash; &mdash;

&lsaquo; &rsaquo; &laquo; &raquo;

&lsquo; &rsquo; &ldquo; &rdquo;

&apos; &quot;

¿ ¡ § ¶

† ‡ • – —

‹ › « »

‘ ’ “ ”

&apos; "

<a name="Other_punctuation.2C_escaping_special_characters"></a>

[<a href="/w/index.php?title=Full_list_of_wiki_markup_notation&action=edit&section=23" title="Edit section: Other punctuation, escaping special characters">edit</a>] Other punctuation, escaping special characters

<p>The <a href="/w/index.php?title=Template:Tag&action=edit&redlink=1" class="new" title="Template:Tag (not yet written)">Template:Tag</a> and <a href="/w/index.php?title=Template:Tag&action=edit&redlink=1" class="new" title="Template:Tag (not yet written)">Template:Tag</a> markup tags are also available. (For writing "[", "{", "&", "}", "]", for example.)

<a name="Commercial_symbols"></a>

[<a href="/w/index.php?title=Full_list_of_wiki_markup_notation&action=edit&section=24" title="Edit section: Commercial symbols">edit</a>] Commercial symbols

<tbody></tbody>
What you type What it looks like
&trade; &copy; &reg; 

&cent; &euro; &yen; &pound; &curren;

™ © ®

¢ € ¥ £ ¤

<a name="Subscripts_and_superscripts"></a>

[<a href="/w/index.php?title=Full_list_of_wiki_markup_notation&action=edit&section=25" title="Edit section: Subscripts and superscripts">edit</a>] Subscripts and superscripts

  • The <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manual_of_Style_%28mathematics%29#Superscripts_and_subscripts" class="extiw" title="wikipedia:Manual_of_Style_(mathematics)">Manual of Style</a> prefers the x<sub>1</sub> format.
  • The latter methods of sub/superscripting cannot be used in the most general context, as they rely on Unicode support which may not be present on all users' machines. For the 1, 2, 3 superscripts, it is nevertheless preferred when possible (as with units of measurement) because most browsers have an easier time formatting lines with it.
<tbody></tbody>
Description What you type What it looks like

Subscripts

x<sub>1</sub> x<sub>2</sub> x<sub>3</sub> or

x&#8320; x&#8321; x&#8322; x&#8323; x&#8324;

x&#8325; x&#8326; x&#8327; x&#8328; x&#8329;

x1 x2 x3 or

x₀ x₁ x₂ x₃ x₄

x₅ x₆ x₇ x₈ x₉

Superscripts

x<sup>1</sup> x<sup>2</sup> x<sup>3</sup> or

x&#8304; x&sup1; x&sup2; x&sup3; x&#8308;

x&#8309; x&#8310; x&#8311; x&#8312; x&#8313;

x1 x2 x3 or

x⁰ x¹ x² x³ x⁴

x⁵ x⁶ x⁷ x⁸ x⁹

Combined

&epsilon;<sub>0</sub> = 8.85 &times; 10<sup>&minus;12</sup> C&sup2; / J m

1 [[hectare]] = [[1 E+4 m&sup2;]]

ε0 = 8.85 × 10−12 C² / J m

1 <a href="/w/index.php?title=Hectare&action=edit&redlink=1" class="new" title="Hectare (not yet written)">hectare</a> = <a href="/w/index.php?title=1_E%2B4_m%C2%B2&action=edit&redlink=1" class="new" title="1 E+4 m² (not yet written)">1 E+4 m²</a>

<a name="Greek_characters"></a>

[<a href="/w/index.php?title=Full_list_of_wiki_markup_notation&action=edit&section=26" title="Edit section: Greek characters">edit</a>] Greek characters

<tbody></tbody>
What you type What it looks like
&alpha; &beta; &gamma; &delta; &epsilon; &zeta;

&eta; &theta; &iota; &kappa; &lambda; &mu; &nu;

&xi; &omicron; &pi; &rho; &sigma; &sigmaf;

&tau; &upsilon; &phi; &chi; &psi; &omega;

&Alpha; &Beta; &Gamma; &Delta; &Epsilon; &Zeta;

&Eta; &Theta; &Iota; &Kappa; &Lambda; &Mu;

&Nu; &Xi; &Omicron; &Pi; &Rho; &Sigma;

&Tau; &Upsilon; &Phi; &Chi; &Psi; &Omega;

α β γ δ ε ζ

η θ ι κ λ μ ν

ξ ο π ρ σ ς

τ υ φ χ ψ ω

Α Β Γ Δ Ε Ζ

Η Θ Ι Κ Λ Μ

Ν Ξ Ο Π Ρ Σ

Τ Υ Φ Χ Ψ Ω

<a name="Mathematical_characters"></a>

[<a href="/w/index.php?title=Full_list_of_wiki_markup_notation&action=edit&section=27" title="Edit section: Mathematical characters">edit</a>] Mathematical characters

  • See also <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WikiProject_Mathematics" class="extiw" title="wikipedia:WikiProject_Mathematics">WikiProject Mathematics</a> and <a href="/w/index.php?title=TeX&action=edit&redlink=1" class="new" title="TeX (not yet written)">TeX</a>.
<tbody></tbody>
What you type What it looks like
&int; &sum; &prod; &radic;

&minus; &plusmn; &infin;

&asymp; &prop; &equiv; &ne;

&le; &ge;

&times; &middot; &divide; &part;

&prime; &Prime;

&nabla; &permil; &deg; &there4; &alefsym;

&oslash;

&isin; &notin; &cap; &cup;

&sub; &sup; &sube; &supe;

&not; &and; &or; &exist; &forall;

&rArr; &lArr; &dArr; &uArr; &hArr;

&rarr; &darr; &uarr; &larr; &harr;

∫ ∑ ∏ √

− ± ∞

≈ ∝ ≡ ≠

≤ ≥

× · ÷ ∂

′ ″

∇ ‰ ° ∴ ℵ

ø

∈ ∉ ∩ ∪

⊂ ⊃ ⊆ ⊇

¬ ∧ ∨ ∃ ∀

⇒ ⇐ ⇓ ⇑ ⇔

→ ↓ ↑ ← ↔

SOME UNICODE:

SOURCE:

http://unicode-table.com/en/

WHAT IS WRONG WITH THE TABLE???

  • 0000
  • 0010
  • 0020
  • !
  • "
  • #
  • $
  • %
  • &
  • '
  • (
  • )
  • *
  • +
  • ,
  • -
  • .
  • /
  • 0030
  • 0
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • :
  • ;
  • <
  • =
  • >
  • ?
  • 0040
  • @
  • A
  • B
  • C
  • D
  • E
  • F
  • G
  • H
  • I
  • J
  • K
  • L
  • M
  • N
  • O
  • 0050
  • P
  • Q
  • R
  • S
  • T
  • U
  • V
  • W
  • X
  • Y
  • Z
  • [
  • \
  • ]
  • ^
  • _
  • 0060
  • `
  • a
  • b
  • c
  • d
  • e
  • f
  • g
  • h
  • i
  • j
  • k
  • l
  • m
  • n
  • o
  • 0070
  • p
  • q
  • r
  • s
  • t
  • u
  • v
  • w
  • x
  • y
  • z
  • {
  • |
  • }
  • ~
  • 0080
  • 0090
  • 00A0
  •  
  • ¡
  • ¢
  • £
  • ¤
  • ¥
  • ¦
  • §
  • ¨
  • ©
  • ª
  • «
  • ¬
  • ­
  • ®
  • ¯
  • 00B0
  • °
  • ±
  • ²
  • ³
  • ´
  • µ
  • ·
  • ¸
  • ¹
  • º
  • »
  • ¼
  • ½
  • ¾
  • ¿
  • 00C0
  • À
  • Á
  • Â
  • Ã
  • Ä
  • Å
  • Æ
  • Ç
  • È
  • É
  • Ê
  • Ë
  • Ì
  • Í
  • Î
  • Ï
  • 00D0
  • Ð
  • Ñ
  • Ò
  • Ó
  • Ô
  • Õ
  • Ö
  • ×
  • Ø
  • Ù
  • Ú
  • Û
  • Ü
  • Ý
  • Þ
  • ß
  • 00E0
  • à
  • á
  • â
  • ã
  • ä
  • å
  • æ
  • ç
  • è
  • é
  • ê
  • ë
  • ì
  • í
  • î
  • ï
  • 00F0
  • ð
  • ñ
  • ò
  • ó
  • ô
  • õ
  • ö
  • ÷
  • ø
  • ù
  • ú
  • û
  • ü
  • ý
  • þ
  • ÿ
  • 0100
  • Ā
  • ā
  • Ă
  • ă
  • Ą
  • ą
  • Ć
  • ć
  • Ĉ
  • ĉ
  • Ċ
  • ċ
  • Č
  • č
  • Ď
  • ď
  • 0110
  • Đ
  • đ
  • Ē
  • ē
  • Ĕ
  • ĕ
  • Ė
  • ė
  • Ę
  • ę
  • Ě
  • ě
  • Ĝ
  • ĝ
  • Ğ
  • ğ
  • 0120
  • Ġ
  • ġ
  • Ģ
  • ģ
  • Ĥ
  • ĥ
  • Ħ
  • ħ
  • Ĩ
  • ĩ
  • Ī
  • ī
  • Ĭ
  • ĭ
  • Į
  • į
  • 0130
  • İ
  • ı
  • IJ
  • ij
  • Ĵ
  • ĵ
  • Ķ
  • ķ
  • ĸ
  • Ĺ
  • ĺ
  • Ļ
  • ļ
  • Ľ
  • ľ
  • Ŀ
  • 0140
  • ŀ
  • Ł
  • ł
  • Ń
  • ń
  • Ņ
  • ņ
  • Ň
  • ň
  • ʼn
  • Ŋ
  • ŋ
  • Ō
  • ō
  • Ŏ
  • ŏ
  • 0150
  • Ő
  • ő
  • Œ
  • œ
  • Ŕ
  • ŕ
  • Ŗ
  • ŗ
  • Ř
  • ř
  • Ś
  • ś
  • Ŝ
  • ŝ
  • Ş
  • ş
  • 0160
  • Š
  • š
  • Ţ
  • ţ
  • Ť
  • ť
  • Ŧ
  • ŧ
  • Ũ
  • ũ
  • Ū
  • ū
  • Ŭ
  • ŭ
  • Ů
  • ů
  • 0170
  • Ű
  • ű
  • Ų
  • ų
  • Ŵ
  • ŵ
  • Ŷ
  • ŷ
  • Ÿ
  • Ź
  • ź
  • Ż
  • ż
  • Ž
  • ž
  • ſ
  • 0180
  • ƀ
  • Ɓ
  • Ƃ
  • ƃ
  • Ƅ
  • ƅ
  • Ɔ
  • Ƈ
  • ƈ
  • Ɖ
  • Ɗ
  • Ƌ
  • ƌ
  • ƍ
  • Ǝ
  • Ə
  • 0190
  • Ɛ
  • Ƒ
  • ƒ
  • Ɠ
  • Ɣ
  • ƕ
  • Ɩ
  • Ɨ
  • Ƙ
  • ƙ
  • ƚ
  • ƛ
  • Ɯ
  • Ɲ
  • ƞ
  • Ɵ
  • 01A0
  • Ơ
  • ơ
  • Ƣ
  • ƣ
  • Ƥ
  • ƥ
  • Ʀ
  • Ƨ
  • ƨ
  • Ʃ
  • ƪ
  • ƫ
  • Ƭ
  • ƭ
  • Ʈ
  • Ư
  • 01B0
  • ư
  • Ʊ
  • Ʋ
  • Ƴ
  • ƴ
  • Ƶ
  • ƶ
  • Ʒ
  • Ƹ
  • ƹ
  • ƺ
  • ƻ
  • Ƽ
  • ƽ
  • ƾ
  • ƿ
  • 01C0
  • ǀ
  • ǁ
  • ǂ
  • ǃ
  • DŽ
  • Dž
  • dž
  • LJ
  • Lj
  • lj
  • NJ
  • Nj
  • nj
  • Ǎ
  • ǎ
  • Ǐ
  • 01D0
  • ǐ
  • Ǒ
  • ǒ
  • Ǔ
  • ǔ
  • Ǖ
  • ǖ
  • Ǘ
  • ǘ
  • Ǚ
  • ǚ
  • Ǜ
  • ǜ
  • ǝ
  • Ǟ
  • ǟ
  • 01E0
  • Ǡ
  • ǡ
  • Ǣ
  • ǣ
  • Ǥ
  • ǥ
  • Ǧ
  • ǧ
  • Ǩ
  • ǩ
  • Ǫ
  • ǫ
  • Ǭ
  • ǭ
  • Ǯ
  • ǯ
  • 01F0
  • ǰ
  • DZ
  • Dz
  • dz
  • Ǵ
  • ǵ
  • Ƕ
  • Ƿ
  • Ǹ
  • ǹ
  • Ǻ
  • ǻ
  • Ǽ
  • ǽ
  • Ǿ
  • ǿ
Loading, please wait...


If you REALLY need some unusual characters, see the following:

http://unicode-table.com/en/sections/

^ BACK TO CONTENTS

  1. Library of Congress
  2. http://www.w3.org/