The Drugging Of Our Children (film)

From BoyWiki
Jump to: navigation, search

The Drugging Of Our Children is a film documentary which examines the prescribing of psychotropic drugs to children and young people and the serious, sometimes deadly, "side effects" from the drugs. Discussed is the fact that many of the "school shooting" incidents in the U.S. involved children being medicated with these drugs.

SIDEBAR INFO FOR ETENNE TO DO HIS MAGIC WITH:

Directors: Manette Loudon, Gary Null
Writer: Gary Null
Stars: Neil Bush, Michael Moore, Gary Null
Country: USA
Language: English
Release Date: 30 April 2005 (USA)
Filming Locations: Colorado, USA
Film poster: http://emro.lib.buffalo.edu/emro/Images/imageCover/druggingchildren.jpg

Film descriptions

In the absence of any objective medical tests to determine who has ADD or ADHD, doctors rely in part on standardized assessments and the impressions of teachers and guardians while the drugs they administer leave little room for other causes or aggravating factors, such as diet, or environment.

Hence, diagnosing a child or adolescent with ADD or ADHD is often the outcome, although no organic basis for either disease has yet to be clinically proven. Psychiatrists may then prescribe psychotropic drugs for the children without first making it clear to parents that these medications can have severe side-effects including insomnia, loss of appetite, headaches, psychotic symptoms and even potentially fatal adverse reactions, such as cardiac arrhythmia.

And yet, despite these dangers, many school systems actually work with government agencies to force parents to drug their children, threatening those who refuse with the prospect of having their children taken from the home unless they cooperate.[1]
Excessive talking, fidgeting, or squirming. Often loses things. Difficulty remaining seated, playing quietly, or sustaining attention. Sound like your child? The American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) lists these as the symptoms of Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD), or Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Once diagnosed, these behaviors would make your child a candidate for Ritalin, Prozac, or both. In this investigative documentary, acclaimed public health advocate and filmmaker Gary Null examines the increasingly common practice of prescribing psychotropic drugs for children, including preschoolers as young as age 2 to 4, who have been diagnosed with ADD, or ADHD. Psychiatrists may write these prescriptions without first exploring other causes or aggravating factors, like diet, or environment, and without making it clear to parents that these medications can have severe side-effects, including insomnia, loss of appetite, facial tics, headaches, psychotic symptoms and even potentially fatal adverse reactions, such as cardiac arrhythmia. Many schools work with family court systems to force parents to drug their children, threatening those who refuse to cooperate with the prospect of having them taken from the home and placed in foster care. To some, this looks like institutionalized child abuse in the name of mental health, whereby active, naturally inquisitive children are drugged into submission while the pharmaceutical industry prospers.[2]
Delivering a disturbing, but important message, The Drugging of Our Children is a powerful and enlightening documentary. In today’s society, children are quick to be labeled with behavioral disorders, most commonly ADD and ADHD, and plied with medication such as Ritalin. But not always addressed are the side effects of these drugs, the possibility of addiction, and the creation of new problems and disorders. And perhaps most egregious is the fact that many children do not really have ADHD and do not need medication.

Drugging provides ample case studies, including children suffering with allergies, learning disorders and boredom, who were misdiagnosed and given powerful drugs they did not need. Ritalin, Prozac and other such drugs are being over prescribed, with no shortage of pressure from the pharmaceutical industry, and these children are hallucinating, suffering manic and depressive episodes, blacking out and even becoming violent. It is claimed that Eric Harris, one of the Columbine shooters, was taking a medication similar to Prozac at the time of his death. The documentary also profiles a mother who lost her child to protective services because she refused to improperly medicate her son. The featured testimonies are truly frightening, and while Drugging does not provide easy or obvious answers, it does provide an enormous amount of awareness.

The documentary is not especially hi-tech or polished in its delivery, and could really get its message across in less than 104 minutes. The technical components of this documentary are average, not quite matching the quality of the content, and the film’s audio and visual editing are also of decent quality. Drugging is enlightening and should be shared widely with parents, education and medical professionals. Drugging is recommended, and is best suited for patient education and consumer health collections, and collections in school or public libraries dedicated to parenting. [3]

Awards

  • 2006 Sedona International Film Festival, Finalist, Best Documentary
  • 2005 WorldFest Houston International Film Festival, Winner, Best Documentary, Platinum Award
  • Key West IndieFest, Winner, Best Documentary
  • New York Film Festival, Finalist, Best Documentary
  • Winnipeg International Film Festival, Finalist, Best Documentary
  • Palm Beach International Film Festival, Finalist, Best Documentary
  • Golden Film Festival, Finalist
  • San Francisco World Film Festival, Finalist, Best Documentary
  • ARPA International Film Festival, Finalist, Best Documentary

Importance to BoyLovers

Psychotropic drugs are not based on good, correctly done science. Disrupting normal brain function with unproven, unreliable but powerful pharmaceutical drugs can cause permanent brain damage or even death. Psychotropic drugs are often prescribed to BoyLovers when undergoing often court-ordered "treatment" by so-called "mental health professionals", and the BoyLover may be unable to refuse the administration of these drugs. In some countries, it is illegal to force anyone to take any medication against their will. This should be true of the U.S. as well.

References


See also

External links

  • Short description of the film and link at Top Documentary Films:
https://topdocumentaryfilms.com/the-drugging-of-our-children/
  • IMDb information:
https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0850665/
http://emro.lib.buffalo.edu/emro/emroDetail.asp?Number=2508
  • Watch the film on YouTube:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=26e5PqrCePk